Let’s not mince words: incontinence is the involuntary passing of urine or faeces.
Conni is here to help manage incontinence so you can reclaim your confidence.

1 in 5 people have incontinence issues

Before buying our Incontinence Products, read below to learn more about precisely what is Incontinence.

Sometimes referred to as Adult Bed Wettingnocturnal enuresis is the condition of vacating your bladding whilst you are asleep.

Why does incontinence happen?

Incontinence is a common concern for men and women of all ages, and there are a number of reasons it occurs. Illness, disability and genital surgery often go hand-in-hand with incontinence issues. One in three women are affected by stress and urge incontinence (or Light Bladder Leakage), compared to one in 10 men. That’s often thanks to pregnancy and birth, which places stress on the pelvic floor muscles and can lead to their weakening (hello, leakage). Meanwhile, later in life, menopause can reduce the thickness and elasticity of the bladder and urethra.

Smoking, obesity, dehydration, alcohol and caffeine consumption and urinary tract infections are also linked to incontinence.

Women are twice as likely as men to experience incontinence

Written by Dr Kathleen Fahy, Registered Nurse and Registered Midwife

The four types of incontinence

Conni products help manage the most common forms of adult incontinence. Here’s what they are, and how we can make a difference.

 

Type

How does it happen?

Conni solution

Functional

A physical disability, obstacle or problems thinking or communicating prevents the person from reaching a toilet.  Sometimes the individual does not recognise the need to go to the toilet. Usually the bladder empties completely.


Factors that may cause functional incontinence may innclude:


- Poor mobility or dexterity issues that could make clothes removal difficult. Poor eyesight could also impact on continence.

- Emotional factors such as depression, anxiety anger could be mean an unwillingness to go to the toilet either in the home or public spaces.

- Environmental factors such as bathrooms that are difficult to enter or exit, poor lighting or tricky toilet spaces

Absorbent and waterproof products:

  • Bed pads

  • Chair pads

  • Floor mats

 
Waterproof, non-absorbent products:

  • Mattress protector

  • Pillow protector

  • Containment swim shorts

  • URF2G – Portable urinal for men

  

Stress
 

Also known as Light Bladder Leakage (LBL), stress is the most common form of incontinence, and happens when small amounts of urine leak out in conjuction with coughing, laughing, sneezing, heavy lifting, playing sport or even changing position.  Sometimes, dribbling of urine continues after going to the toilet.

Most common in women, but many men will experience stress incontinence after prostate surgery and recovery can take 6 to 12 months.

Pelvic floor exercises are recommended for both men and women.

For light leakage:

  • Women’s incontinence undergarment liner pads

  • Men’s incontinence undergarment liner pads

 
For moderate volumes:

  • Women’s incontinence briefs 

  • Men’s incontinence briefs 

  • URF2G – Portable urinal for men

 

Urge

That feeling of needing to go to the toilet in a hurry—and not getting there in time. It might mean passing small or large volumes of urine, and when urge incontinence happens at night, the bed may be wet.


It may be caused by a range of factors, including health conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, and overactive bladder or other conditions that impact the communication between bladder and brain via the spinal cord.


Over consumptions of fluids such as caffeinefound in tea, coffee, alcohol and carbonated drinks has also been linked to this form or incontinence.

For small volumes:

  • Women’s incontinence undergarment liner pads 

  • Men’s incontinence undergarment liner pads 

For moderate volumes:

  • Women’s incontinence briefs 

  • Men’s incontinence briefs 

For large volumes:

  • Bed pads

  • Chair pads

  • Floor mat

  • Draw Mac [is this the correct term? Couldn’t find on the website] mattress protector

  • Pillow protector

  • URF2G – Portable urinal for men

  

Mixed

Stress and urge incontinence can come hand in hand.


Many people just live with incontinence, but chatting to a medical professional, like your GP or a continence nurse, can make a big difference. Often, the easiest way to manage continence issues comes down to simple steps like a change of diet, pelvic floor exercises and products to help you reclaim your confidence.

For moderate volumes:

  • Women’s incontinence pants 

  • Men’s incontinence pants 

 
For large volumes:

  • Bed pads

  • Chair pads

  • Floor mat

  • Draw Mac mattress protector

  • Pillow protector

 

What can be done to improve or cure adult incontinence?

The most important things for bladder and pelvic floor health and re-training are:

  1. Perform Kegal pelvic floor exercises on a daily basis. Click here for tips from the Royal Women's Hospital.
  2. Check for and treat any urinary tract infection or constipation.
  3. Ensure adequate hydration; that is 6-8 glasses of water a day.
  4. Eliminate or limit alcohol and caffeine, which irritate the bladder.
  5. Don't get into the habit of going to the toilet 'just in case'.
  6. Train yourself to delay going to the toilet so that you go only when your bladder is full.
  7. Don’t rush to the toilet: use whatever works and then wait for the urge to pass and then go calmly to the toilet.
  8. Don’t rush where you are at the toilet: take your time so that your bladder can fully empty.
  9. Women should sit to go to the toilet. Do not hover over the toilet seat.
  10. Maintain normal body weight.
  11. Don’t smoke.
  12. If you have urge incontinence your doctor may prescribe medication to relax the bladder so it is less irritable. 
  13. Conni's products for incontinence that offer discreet, comfortable protection: allowing you, or your loved one, to reclaim self-confidence and dignity.

Conni recommends that you speak with your doctor for further assistance.
You may find our range of bed pads, underwear and other incontinence products of some help.
Should you wish to speak with someone further, the following links may be of help.

References and Further Information 

Continence Foundation of Australia
http://www.continence.org.au/

CFA Logo 2013 Small 


Australian Department of Health and Aging: bowel and bladder website. 
http://www.bladderbowel.gov.au/about/habits/

Women’s Bladder Health Website.
http://www.womensbladderhealth.com/content/riskfactors/index.html